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Pharrell Fronts New Issue of COMPLEX

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Super Producer Pharrell Williams covers COMPLEX magazine’s Best of 2013 issue.

Williams has had a great year; from collaborating with 80s group Daft Punk, to singing on Robin Thicke’s smash song, “Blurred Lines.”

Now, Williams is chatting with the magazine about his music, PETA and Miley Cyrus:

Here’s some of his Complex interview:

On Miley Cyrus:
“I’m not worried about Miley. I’ve seen her soul in action. She’s 20 years old and enjoying her life. She’s enjoying her freedom. [With her style] I’m talking about her everyday dressing—she shuts it the f*** down. Not too many people really understand the Chanel vocabulary like her. Like, she’s a problem.”

On the PETA movement:
“I sympathize with their movement and I recognize that people could be impressionable. But at the same time, I like fashion. And I don’t like being told what to do.”

On his new album:
“I love rapping. But something’s coming, and I’m not rapping on it.”

On family:
“My son. Our son. It’s like, that’s our world. Helen and I having Rocket, it’s been awesome. It’s the best song that I’ve ever co-written.”

Daft Punk and Gisele Bündchen Cover WSJ Magazine

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Gisele Bündchen and Daft Punk jointly cover the November issue of WSJ magazine.

Both talents cover the Innovations issue, which is fitting since the model and band have been making unique strides in their respective industries.

Terry Richardson photographed the trio for the cover.

Daft Punk “Lose Yourself to Dance” Ft. Pharrell Williams, Nile Rodgers [Official Music Video]

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Get lost in music with Daft Punk, Nile Rodgers and Pharrell Williams.

The trio breaks tradition with the music video for “Lose Yourself to Dance.” Instead of  releasing a traditional three-minute video, the gang opted for a video running just  a little over a minute.  Even though the video is short, the imagery and shimmer are amazing!

“Lose Yourself to Dance” is the second single from Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories album. It was released on August 13, 2013.

Check out the video below.

Daft Punk & Pharrell Cover VIBE’s Summer Issue

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Daft Punk and Pharrell have one of the hottest songs of the summer. So what better way to praise the dynamic trio than by putting them on the cover of VIBE’s Summer Issue.

This issue, which also serves as the magazine’s 20th Anniversary issue, has the “Get Lucky” singers dishing on the success of the hit 80s band’s new album, Random Access Memories.

VIBE: What drew you guys to work with Pharrell on Random Access Memories?
THOMAS BANGALTER: We’ve always been big fans of his work and output as a producer, rapper and musician. But what we really appreciate more than anything is a multitalented artist that has a strong aura and is super talented, charismatic and very glamorous. His natural glamour—he is as elegant in jeans [as he is] in a tuxedo.
PHARRELL WILLIAMS: Thank you.

Do you remember your first time hearing Daft Punk?

WILLIAMS: I’ll never forget. I was talking to this girl, and all of a sudden I heard a song and was like, “What the fuck is that?” Because it just seemed like something regal, something very royal and different, from a higher caliber. When that guy sang “One More Time,” I was like, “What the?!” And then it was everywhere. Like, I heard it in cars in the hood. From that point I was in love with the sound and the groove. Isn’t that the most amazing feeling when we hear something and ask, “What is it?”
GUY-MANUEL DE HOMEM-CHRISTO: That never happens to us.
BANGALTER: It’s cool as a musician to be challenged by new music. It’s always something you look for, because all of us are music lovers. We have this repertoire where each time there is a song that makes a difference, people know it.

Did you expect Random Access Memories to be received so well after being off the scene for so long?

BANGALTER: We were very surprised about how much our project got noticed in a world where we went undercover for a long time. But there is no fear in what we are doing. There is no insecurity of being in the spotlight or losing the spotlight—that’s not what drives us. We’re amazed at how many ways we can connect with people through music and art because we don’t take anything for granted.

You connected with Kanye West to help produce his Yeezus LP. It sounds very different from when he sampled you guys for “Stronger.”

BANGALTER: It’s good that it is different, beccause the impact that “Stronger” had is very important. Somehow, it turned out to be this combination between hip-hop and electronic music, and almost started the mix of those genres. We’re all trying to push the envelope and to see where the music can go.

“Lose Yourself to Dance” is the second single, also featuring Pharrell. What is the statement of that song?

WILLIAMS: “Lose Yourself to Dance” makes me feel like walking down the street in the middle of the night in London and it’s 1984, 1985. I don’t hear ’70s in that at all. For me, it doesn’t sound at all like a Bowie record, but I feel like David Bowie would have loved that record. He could actually sing it.
BANGALTER: We’re trying to define—or redefine—what dance floor music can be. Whether it’s something lighter or something more primer. “Lose Yourself to Dance” is almost this idea of a timeless place or dance floor where you can lose yourself. The idea of unity of the dance floor, people being connected.

Check out more photos of the trio over at VIBE.com.

Photos: Karl Ferguson for VIBE

Kanye West Chats with ‘W Magazine’ About “Yeezus” & Kim Kardashian

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Kanye West is features in the new issue of W magazine.

In an article titled,”Kanye West: The Transformer,” the “Yeezus” rapper opens up about Kim Kardashian, his narcissism, being rich, his music and much more.

Reporter Christopher Bagley sat down with West to chat about the aforementioned. Check out some of the highlights from their interview below.

 

On how agreeing to attend one runway show led to the song “I Am God:”

West was informed that he’d be invited to a widely anticipated runway show only on the condition that he agree not to attend any other shows. “So the next day I went to the studio with Daft Punk, and I wrote ‘I Am a God,’?” West says. “Cause it’s like, Yo! Nobody can tell me where I can and can’t go. Man, I’m the No. 1 living and breathing rock star. I am Axl Rose; I am Jim Morrison; I am Jimi Hendrix.” West is not smiling as he says this, and his voice is getting louder with each sentence. “You can’t say that you love music and then say that Kanye West can’t come to your show! To even think they could tell me where I could and couldn’t go is just ludicrous. It’s blasphemous—to rock ’n’ roll, and to music.”

On why he named the song “I Am God:”

“I made that song because I am a god,” he says finally. He laughs for a second, then stops. “I don’t think there’s much more explanation. I’m not going to sit here and defend shit. That shit is rock ’n’ roll, man. That shit is rap music. I am a god. Now what?”

On W’s 2010 cover of a nude Kim Kardashian:

“I loved the fact that it happened, that it disturbed people. I loved the fact that it put those curves right inside that Hamptons house, that there’s some Hamptons husbands who had to cover that up.”

In his narcissism:

“On one end, I try to scale it back,” he says. “Because I don’t want to close any of the doors needed to create the best product possible. But my ego is my drug. My drug is, ‘I’m better than all you other motherfuckers. Kiss my ass!’ ”

On an unidentified woman threatening to release a raunchy video of her and West:

“For the most part, I’d rather people have one of those home videos than some of the paparazzi photos that get published,” he says. “At least I recorded the shit myself. That tape couldn’t have hurt me in any way if it came out—it could only have helped.” He finally decided against releasing it, but don’t be surprised if he changes his mind. “Now, I just do exactly what I want, whenever I want, how the fuck I want,” West says. “ ‘Fuck you’ is my message.”

On  helping Kim K. revamp her closet:

“Nobody can tell my girl what to do,” he says. “She just needed to be given some platforms of information to work from.” Since virtually everything Kardashian wears is instantly broadcast around the globe, West adds, “one beautiful thing is that as she discovers it, the world discovers it.” This includes Kardashian’s inevitable stumbles. “For her to take that risk in front of the world, it just shows you how much she loves me. And how much she actually loves the opportunity to learn. You got, like, a million companies saying, ‘This is impacting your brand! This is impacting your fans! And blah blah blah.’ But she still sees this light of beauty.”

On being comfortable:

“I’m not comfortable with comfort,” he says. “I’m only comfortable when I’m in a place where I’m constantly learning and growing.”

For the full interview, visit W magazine’s official website.

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