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Daft Punk & Pharrell Cover VIBE’s Summer Issue

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Daft Punk and Pharrell have one of the hottest songs of the summer. So what better way to praise the dynamic trio than by putting them on the cover of VIBE’s Summer Issue.

This issue, which also serves as the magazine’s 20th Anniversary issue, has the “Get Lucky” singers dishing on the success of the hit 80s band’s new album, Random Access Memories.

VIBE: What drew you guys to work with Pharrell on Random Access Memories?
THOMAS BANGALTER: We’ve always been big fans of his work and output as a producer, rapper and musician. But what we really appreciate more than anything is a multitalented artist that has a strong aura and is super talented, charismatic and very glamorous. His natural glamour—he is as elegant in jeans [as he is] in a tuxedo.
PHARRELL WILLIAMS: Thank you.

Do you remember your first time hearing Daft Punk?

WILLIAMS: I’ll never forget. I was talking to this girl, and all of a sudden I heard a song and was like, “What the fuck is that?” Because it just seemed like something regal, something very royal and different, from a higher caliber. When that guy sang “One More Time,” I was like, “What the?!” And then it was everywhere. Like, I heard it in cars in the hood. From that point I was in love with the sound and the groove. Isn’t that the most amazing feeling when we hear something and ask, “What is it?”
GUY-MANUEL DE HOMEM-CHRISTO: That never happens to us.
BANGALTER: It’s cool as a musician to be challenged by new music. It’s always something you look for, because all of us are music lovers. We have this repertoire where each time there is a song that makes a difference, people know it.

Did you expect Random Access Memories to be received so well after being off the scene for so long?

BANGALTER: We were very surprised about how much our project got noticed in a world where we went undercover for a long time. But there is no fear in what we are doing. There is no insecurity of being in the spotlight or losing the spotlight—that’s not what drives us. We’re amazed at how many ways we can connect with people through music and art because we don’t take anything for granted.

You connected with Kanye West to help produce his Yeezus LP. It sounds very different from when he sampled you guys for “Stronger.”

BANGALTER: It’s good that it is different, beccause the impact that “Stronger” had is very important. Somehow, it turned out to be this combination between hip-hop and electronic music, and almost started the mix of those genres. We’re all trying to push the envelope and to see where the music can go.

“Lose Yourself to Dance” is the second single, also featuring Pharrell. What is the statement of that song?

WILLIAMS: “Lose Yourself to Dance” makes me feel like walking down the street in the middle of the night in London and it’s 1984, 1985. I don’t hear ’70s in that at all. For me, it doesn’t sound at all like a Bowie record, but I feel like David Bowie would have loved that record. He could actually sing it.
BANGALTER: We’re trying to define—or redefine—what dance floor music can be. Whether it’s something lighter or something more primer. “Lose Yourself to Dance” is almost this idea of a timeless place or dance floor where you can lose yourself. The idea of unity of the dance floor, people being connected.

Check out more photos of the trio over at VIBE.com.

Photos: Karl Ferguson for VIBE

Iman Covers ‘The Edit’ Magazine

 

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Net-A-Porter has released a new issue of its magazine, The Edit. And this time around, Supermodel Iman is on the cover.

Iman has always led a private life, but in this issue the model talks about how she keeps her personal business, just that…personal.

On her life after modeling:

“I’m not a model any more. I’m just me. I’m not working in front of a camera.”

On staying low-key and why her and husband David Bowie gravitated towards one another:

“The quiet part of it is intentional, because first of all I’m going to be 58 in July,” she says. “I wouldn’t lie about that, especially as a woman. So it has been a long career. Both David and I stay out of the celebrity thing. That’s why we gravitated towards each other, because we really feel that the personal should be separate from the professional. I’ve never had any members of the press in my home. Oprah [Winfrey] tried to photograph my closet. I said, ‘But it’s in the apartment and nobody steps in there.'”

On how her weight-gain gave her a fresh-face:

“My natural weight is 130 pounds and I’m 142 now. I was 160 when I was pregnant, so it’s a little too much for me. Still, I call it natural Botox. I look at myself in the mirror and I’ve never looked younger. It’s the weight I have put on,” she says. “In the west, we have become accustomed to needing to lose weight, right? But as we get older, for women especially, it makes us look a little haggard. So my consolation about this weight is that it’s given me a fresh face. The rest of it, I’m sitting on it.”

On living in NYC, but staying out of the spotlight:

“I still take my little girl to school,” Iman says. “David picks her up. It’s easier than any place we’ve ever lived. People are too cool to bother you.”

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