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Naomie Harris & Marion Cotillard Cover ELLE Magazine’s Women in Hollywood Issue

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Marion Cotillard and Naomie Harris cover separate editions of ELLE magazine’s ‘Beauties in Hollywood’ issue.

This issue is dedicated to the women of Hollywood who are making strides on and off the big screen.

For more with Cotillard and Harris, pick up the new issue of ELLE!

Marion Cotillard-
On being an actress:
“When I was a kid, I started to have a lot of questions about human beings, and I was a troubled child because of all of these questions. I guess that’s why I became an actress. Not only because my parents were actors and, yeah, it’s a beautiful thing to tell stories, but I think I became an actress because I wanted to explore this- to explore what a human being is.”

Naomi Harris –
On standing up for herself:
“On my first film, I played a stowaway on a ship heading to Germany, and the director told me I was going to be thrown into the sea. But he didn’t have any stunt coordinators! I told him I would agree to be pushed over the side, but only if I could watch him getting pushed over first. Both of us stayed dry.”

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Janet Jackson covers INSTINCT magazine’s Dec/Jan issue

 

In the past two months, it seems as though Janet Jackson has been on the cover of every magazine. This time around, the “Feedback” singer is featured on the Dec/Jan issue of Instinct magazine.  Instinct magazine is one of the hottest gay men’s magazine around. To order this issue, visit InstinctMagazine.com.

Photos & interview snippets from Janet Jackson’s ‘Health’ magazine feature

Last week, we showed you Janet Jackson’s Health magazine cover. We now have some snippets from her feature and a couple of pictures from the magazine spread. Read below as Janet opens up about her own self-image issues.
 
Janet talks about….

Celebrities being put on pedestals: “People tend to put entertainers on pedestals. We’re human beings, just like you… whether we have money or not, we still have bills to pay, we still have our stresses.”
Getting colonics as a pre-teen: “Once a month my mother would drive us to downtown L.A for the procedure. That played a big part in my life and career, because I learned at a very young age what discipline truly meant, to be able to pass up the French fries and the piece of candy.”

Being criticized about her weight as a kid: “When I did Good Times, they used to bind my chest because I was developing breasts at a young age… It immediately makes you think, ‘The way I am isn’t good enough.’ They thought I was too heavy and that I needed to lose weight. When I look back at the show, I was your average-size kid.”

If she loves acting more than singing: “I have more of a passion for acting than I do singing, because singing comes so much easier to me. Acting is more of a challenge. I always say to people, ‘I’m really in the wrong business because I don’t like being in front of huge crowds, and I don’t like it when a lot of people are
looking at me.’”

Source: Health magazine

Raven Symone dishes on being a role model, goals and Bill Cosby advice

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Child star turned entrepreneur Raven Symone has really come into her own. Symone speaking candidly on her career, goals, bring a role model, advice she received from Bill Cosby and much more. Read what the mini mogul had to say on each of these subjects below.

Your babies will absolutely adore Iridessa because…
Her outfit is made from sunflower petals—so cute! She’s also a light fairy, which means she makes the rainbows come alive and puts the lights in the fireflies’ little bums, and she’s the type of girl that always gets straight A’s, but she’s not one of those irritating straight-A kind of girls. She’s still down for the cause, but she’s the girl who will come with you on your adventure and say, “You know this isn’t right, right? Okay, just so you know. Now let’s go move something and scare somebody!”

The transition from child star to grown up worked for me because…
I am who I am. I don’t try to do a role I don’t personally understand because I haven’t reached that point in my life yet. For the longest time there was a movie on my plate they wanted me to do, but I wouldn’t do it because I had to kiss a boy. I don’t like PDA. I know this is my craft but I’m afraid of kissing people on TV. I don’t like it. I did a little bit on That’s So Raven because I knew the person and we were cool and the people behind the scenes were cool about it. But I try my best to pick roles I can understand as a human being and that I’ve been through and as I get older and more comfortable in my skin, I’ll continue to do that. If I’m 30, I’ll pick a role that portrays a 30-year-old in my eyes. I also do things so my parent and my grandparents don’t get mad at me. I don’t want to hear, “You made our family look crazy.” I still have that to worry about. We’re from the south. It’s more than the public I have to listen to; I got my mama and my daddy and my grandparents watching. They’re more of my critics than anyone else.


I really like roles I can understand. I did a movie called Revenge of the Bridesmaids where I played a 26-year-old author. I drank some wine, I said some curse words that people hear everyday that aren’t necessarily the really harsh ones. But you know I’m 24, I got bills to pay, I do stuff like that in my normal life so, I feel like I can do that truthfully on camera. And I will do that for the rest of my life. And the cool thing about it is that working with Disney is that I’m able to go back and forth. With ABC family I can be old, and ABC I can be older, and Disney I can be a character in Tinkerbell and still have fun with that. I think when people put too much emphasis on anything, it makes people say, “Oh my gosh, what’s going on?” Just be you. For me I consider myself a comedienne in that sense. My risk-taking will definitely come as I grow up and I mature.

I don’t mind being a role model for kids who wear my name on their shirts and backpacks, but…
I didn’t get into acting to become a role model. I understand people are looking at me and looking up to me, but the one thing I have to say to those people is, it’s really cool to admire people for sure. But realize there are so many other people in this world who are 17 million times better than I that you should be looking up toward. The people doing volunteer work, the people in the trenches cleaning up after natural disasters and disasters that humans make themselves, we need to need to start focusing on them and less on the entertainment industry. And yes this may take some work away from me, but we need to realize that we’re humanity and there’s more to life than music and acting. But I am conscious in the sense that when I have children and those children have children, I want to make sure that they’re proud of their grandma. I do it for that reason. Any other reason to me is selfish.

The thing people getting into the business most need to do is…
Understand the business aspect of the industry and see what people go through. There are a lot of people in the industry that, even though you might only see them when they’re in their drunken stupor or they’re about to go to jail, their business acumen is crazy. I love telling people about my work behind the scenes. I learned it all before I turned 18; I used to go to the meetings with my parents and they would say, “Shh… don’t speak.” You hear more when you listen. When you’re talking, the only thing you can hear is yourself. So I learned that when I was young. And as I grow up, especially being an African American young woman in the industry for the last 23 years, I’m clear that people want to come in and make money off me but not really know who I am and try to change me. You have to take control of your business, your brand, and your likeness.
Being famous is easy. But to sustain a career takes work. I’m still learning because there are changes everyday. I mean, I’m old school; I grew up in the 90s. I’m really bad at Twitter. Worse than a 75-year-old. But no one knows me better than me, and I have to put myself out there and take chances and if anything bad happens, I don’t want to have to blame anyone but me. It’s my choice and I live with it.


My goal in life is…
That by the time I’m 40, I’m sitting up in a beautiful mansion in the middle of nowhere and this phone call happens at 10 a.m. every morning and someone says, “This is how much you have in your account,” and I happily say, “Okay, thank you!”

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